Microsoft's new password manager is available on Edge and Chrome browsers, and Android, iOS devices.


 

Microsoft is launching password managers for Edge, Chrome, and mobile users on both Android and iOS platforms. The new password manager from Microsoft is not a standalone app but integrated into the Microsoft Authenticator app that is used to authenticate sign-ins for Microsoft services that use two-factor authentication. The passwords synced with the Microsoft account on the Edge browser can be auto-filled in apps or websites on Chrome and Edge browsers as well as on Android and iOS devices. To sync passwords on the Chrome browser, Microsoft has also introduced a new Microsoft Autofill extension.


Only Microsoft users will be able to take advantage of the password manager because the tool will require a Microsoft ID for sign-in. This is similar to how Google allows password management via Chrome using a Google account. The Microsoft Authenticator is getting the password management tool as a beta version. It is available to everyone, meaning both iOS and Android users. To be able to use it on Android or iOS, you will have to grant it full access and set it as the default autofill password provider on your device. You need to have a Microsoft account to be able to use the new password management service but people who have an enterprise account will not be able to use this service.


Microsoft has not said why enterprise users are not eligible for using this service but it has created what looks like a permission list for businesses to allow their employees to use the password management services.


Microsoft is rumored to be working on a full-fledged password management service for Microsoft 365 customers, but there is no estimate on when this service will debut for these customers. Since Microsoft 365 is a paid service, the password management service for the subscribers will have extra features that will explain the difference between the two kinds of password management services.

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