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Cigarette smoking linked to increased risk of bladder cancer recurrence

A new study has found that long-term cigarette smoking is associated with an increased risk of recurrence of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). The study, published in JAMA Network Open, followed 1,472 patients with NMIBC for an average of over two years and found that those who smoked cigarettes for a longer period of time and who smoked more packs per year were at a higher risk for cancer recurrence.


The study did not find a link between the use of e-cigarettes or marijuana and the risk of cancer recurrence. These findings highlight the need for efforts to reduce cigarette smoking, which is the leading cause of preventable death and disease worldwide.


"Our study adds to the growing body of evidence that cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for bladder cancer," said lead author Marilyn Kwan. "These findings underscore the importance of smoking cessation for reducing the risk of bladder cancer recurrence and progression."


Bladder cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, with an estimated 441,000 new cases and 186,000 deaths each year. Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer, which is often treated with surgery, is the most common form of the disease. However, the risk of cancer recurrence is high, with up to 70% of patients experiencing a recurrence within five years of initial treatment.


The findings of this study highlight the need for continued efforts to reduce cigarette smoking and promote smoking.

The new study has found that long-term cigarette smoking is associated with an increased risk of recurrence of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). The study, published in JAMA Network Open, followed 1,472 patients with NMIBC for an average of over two years and found that those who smoked cigarettes for a longer period of time and who smoked more packs per year were at a higher risk for cancer recurrence. In contrast, the study did not find a link between the use of e-cigarettes, pipes, cigars, or marijuana and the risk of cancer recurrence. These findings highlight the need for efforts to reduce cigarette smoking, which is the leading cause of preventable death and disease worldwide.


Bladder cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, with an estimated 441,000 new cases and 186,000 deaths each year. Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer, which is often treated with surgery, is the most common form of the disease. However, the risk of cancer recurrence is high, with up to 70% of patients experiencing a recurrence within five years of initial treatment.


The findings of this study highlight the need for continued efforts to reduce cigarette smoking and promote smoking cessation in order to reduce the risk of bladder cancer recurrence and progression. "Our study adds to the growing body of evidence that cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for bladder cancer," said lead author Marilyn Kwan. "These findings underscore the importance of smoking cessation for reducing the risk of bladder cancer recurrence and progression."


Journal nformation: Marilyn L. Kwan et al, Smoking Behaviors and Prognosis in Patients With Non–Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer in the Be-Well Study, JAMA Network Open (2022). DOI: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.44430
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